A Daily Wine Blog » Daily Wine News: Intervention



Posted by | Posted in Wine News | Posted on 10-04-2022

“Wine is fundamentally a high-intervention product. Without a tremendous amount of human guidance, grapes on the vine either become bird food, more vines, or compost. Even if we were to limit usage of the term to only what happens once grapes enter the winery, a substantial amount of human effort still goes into turning those grapes into a tasty bottle of wine. Pretending otherwise does a disservice to all of that skill, knowledge, and labor, and it also further encourages wine drinkers to think about wine only in terms of what is in the glass or the bottle, and not about everything that happened to get it there.” In VinePair, Zach Geballe breaks down the problems with “low-intervention” wine.

In Wine Enthusiast, Maria C. Hunt explores the process of succession for wineries. “A clean and drama-free transition from one generation to the next is rare in any industry. In most family wineries, succession is a process, with founders and their children working together sharing duties and decisions. Succession can pose a challenge unless the family defines expectations and specific roles.”

Lauren Paterson reports on how Washington winemakers are using new technologies to combat smoke taint. 

When it first hit the shelves Toro wine Numanthia turned heads, but how has it negotiated changing tastes? Margaret Rand takes a look in Wine-Searcher.

In Food & Wine, Anna Lee Iijima explains how to find the best wines from Burgundy.

In the San Francisco Chronicle, Jess Lander and Esther Mobley highlight the most beautiful wineries in Napa and Sonoma.

In New Jersey Monthly, I look at how port has found a new place in cocktails.



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